Hosting & Domaining Forum

Hosting Discussion => Cloud Hosting => Topic started by: arthyk on Sep 10, 2022, 12:27 PM

Title: Scalability - what is it?
Post by: arthyk on Sep 10, 2022, 12:27 PM
There is such a property of cloud hosting as scalability, supposedly it is a big advantage for site owners. Can you briefly find out what it will give me as the owner of a training blog site, where small videos appear several times a month, and images and texts a couple of times a week? That is, is it worth it to prefer and pay extra for this type of hosting? Attendance I will most likely not be higher than average for a blog of moderate promotion. ???
Title: Re: Scalability - what is it?
Post by: johngf on Sep 13, 2022, 07:17 AM
Quote from: arthyk on Sep 10, 2022, 12:27 PMThere is such a property of cloud hosting as scalability, supposedly it is a big advantage for site owners. Can you briefly find out what it will give me as the owner of a training blog site, where small videos appear several times a month, and images and texts a couple of times a week? That is, is it worth it to prefer and pay extra for this type of hosting? Attendance I will most likely not be higher than average for a blog of moderate promotion. ???
Scalability is something like moredirization or server enhancement. But for your case it will not be a significant plus. So how can you continue to work and not pay extra.
Title: Re: Scalability - what is it?
Post by: peterwiter on Nov 15, 2022, 11:08 AM
regarding scalability, it is available on all types of virtual web servers. If it is necessary to scale up to the level of a quad-core server, then it is already logical to scale the number of servers, and not virtual machines.
Since the air will be sold to the client, or he will pay 3-4 times the price than for the server. Look at the same Linode rates as any other. For example, I personally do not even offer tariffs higher than a dedicated server, since it is better to offer the client a whole server with an accompanying service. Although there is a possibility of such an order.

As for the reduction/ increase of the disk, then everything is generally simple: it increases /decreases without problems on container virtualization of the OpenVZ/Virtuozzo type without stopping. But this is the most lousy way of virtualization, since virtual machines are dependent on each other and the performance of disk operations is really lower, although developers tell other fairy tales.
It is because of these virtualizations that the authority of all VPS has fallen below the baseboard.
On hardware virtualizations such as KVM, Xen, and Vmware, you can also organize a performance buffer.

For example, I personally can offer such an opportunity, but I know that this solution is lousy. (and then a cloudworker will come down from the clouds and say ... ) The most productive image of a virtual disk of a virtual machine is obtained when using LVM.
Performance loss compared to real hardware at the level of several percent. This type of disk can be increased depending on the file system that is used on the virtual machine. But it is not recommended. You can reduce it only by stopping and transferring the entire system to a reduced image. I personally suggest to my clients to do as it is done on ordinary Unix servers - the OS is at a minimum size of 10 GB, and then, with growth, you can add storage at will.
Both performance and scalability are maintained. On KVM virtual machines, you can stuff up to 25 virtual disks. I have never used more than 4 in practice. You can mix one SSD, another SATA, a third network. You can build a RAID on the virtual machine itself. Anything is possible. But nothing can be done on the cloud, only network storage.