Domain Sales Methods

Started by chirkovmisha, Sep 10, 2022, 12:29 AM

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chirkovmishaTopic starter

Hello everybody.
In one of forum topics they wrote me that I use a "cold" sales method. My question is, what is the "hot" method in that case?
Is there any classification of domain names  selling methods?
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DiHard

Cold - you and the client have not previously communicated with each other on the subject of the product - in that case, the domain. You have the first communication on your initiative.
Warm - either on your initiative or on the initiative of the client, you had a repeat dialogue, after which the client expressed interest, but at the end said "I'll think about it", "we have already approved the budget", "maybe next month, year", etc.
You had a second conversation (you warmed up the client, or he warmed up himself).

Hot is the next step after warm, you have already had a dialogue, the client knows what you are offering and is ready to buy. You had a third communication (the client is almost ready, you need to take it)

At the same time, it is possible to separate the ways of communication and customers by "temperature". For instance, you make a "cold call", but the client on the other end is already "hot". It doesn't matter how it was "warmed up". And bam - you're selling!
Or you make a "hot" call (the client has already asked for an invoice, is ready to pay, etc.), and the client at the other end suddenly turns out to be "cold" (it is unknown who "cooled" him, relatives, acquaintances, etc.) and the client suddenly refuses to pay, while the client himself can make a "hot" call when he "warmed up" (independently or through someone's efforts).

Ideally, when the client is "hot", you can "Warm" the client in different ways. Targeted advertising, mailing lists, calls, multi-channel sequences (including in advertising and in calls and mailings, etc.), social engineering, etc. If it turned out to warm up from the first contact - it's great!
Naturally, all these divisions are very conditional. For each industry, for each organization, there can be its own gradations, its own scale of "degree"
That is my free interpretation.
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